A Servant Leader

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servant leader

© Wayhome Studio – Fotolia.com

This is a guest post from Tonya Buckner of BucknerMT Management & Technology, Inc.

“The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between, the leader is a servant.” – Max De Pree

“Servant leaders”, as mentioned in the above quote, not only have to focus on what’s happening today, but what is happening in the future. Yes, today’s problems must be solved, profits must be made and bills must be paid, but a great leader must focus on the future and transforming the culture. It is more than checking items off a checklist. A great leader has a vision and a roadmap to successfully get there. This requires being inspired to achieve it, communicating it, and guiding the company from where it is to where it needs to be!

The top spot is not the only leader. Every level has leaders, whether positive or negative. Doomsayers can be leaders, too. They challenge the vision with their need to combat. Eighty percent of a company’s problems comes from twenty percent of its people. People will rise or fall to the level you set for them. It is important to foster a culture of optimism and the desire to succeed. If not challenged or motivated people will fall.

The key to leadership is to be fair, firm and consistent. Discipline starts with the leader; people will follow the lead you set. To master leadership you need to know what you are doing, find your inner voice, be creative, enjoy the process, and share that joy with others. Successful leaders are selfless, put others first, and look for other people’s 15 minutes of fame – not their own.

A servant leader supports others. This requires praising them in public and critiquing in confidence, driving out fear, and learning from mistakes. Most importantly, as a great leader you make those you lead successful, and as a result you become successful.

Leadership is directly related to character. Character is determined by your behavior, which is reflective of the value system that is in place. When people perceive you as a strong leader, they will believe in you, even if they don’t agree with you.

Despite the myth, leaders are not born nor is leadership innate for everyone. The good news is there are various programs to assist in developing leadership skills. The key is finding the program that best suits your needs. For instance, there is the Women President Educational Organization (WPEO), which develops and mentors presidents of women-owned businesses, the Montgomery County’s Veterans Institute of Procurement (VIP), which assists veteran leaders to foster success as businesses and employers, and the Goldman Sachs 10K Small Business Program, which is aimed at business growth and job creation, just to name a few.

Servant leaders also understand the importance of mentorship. Mentors assist in navigating through the obstacles that are not taught in leadership programs. By sharing best practices and lessons learned, mentees are able to build on their experience and avoid pitfalls.

Lastly, the bottom line as a leader is to ask yourself, do my actions represent who I believe I am? Remember that it is not about the position, it is about your actions; thoughtful actions with leadership in mind, drive and sculpt companies to new heights.

BucknerMT Management & Technology, Inc. (BucknerMT, Inc.) is a verified service-disabled veteran-owned small business (SDVOSB) and woman-owned small business (WOSB). Since 2007, BucknerMT have supported the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) by providing services that include engineering, integrating, and sustaining critical military platforms and systems.

This post originally appeared on Bill Jaffe’s blog at http://blog.federalsmallbizsavvy.com/leadership/a-servant-leader/ and was reprinted with permission.